Tag Archives: Avid

The death of big broadcast iron

gearsIABM DC releaed its 2016 Global Market Valuation and Strategy Report February 24, and the news for media technology companies was not good. Overall spending for media technology products and services was down 4.3% year over year. The report also noted that product revenues have been in decline since 2012, but this is the first year since the report shows a decline in services spending as well.

Much of the decline can be attributed to disruption from the bottom of the market. What were previously considered lower end tools, such as Adobe Premiere Pro in editing and Axle in asset management have matured a surprisingly brisk pace and have proven themselves ready for prime time.

Technology disruption also plays a part in the overall decline. As IP-video takes hold, the need for satellite links can be replaced by bonded 4G connectivity. “@Home” production of live sports is also lessening the demand for infrastructure. A sign of things to come is Boston-based NESN (MLB Red Sox and NHL Bruins) and LiveU’s announcement in December that portends the demise of the OB truck.

The network will utilize multiple cameras feeding back to NESN’s Boston-area studios via bonded cellular technology.

NESN plans to use multiple LU500 portable transmission units to pilot live “@Home Productions” on the majority of Red Sox home and road spring training Games in 2016 as part of a new innovation and business model for sports coverage. NESN and LiveU successfully developed and tested this new means of remote event coverage last spring during Red Sox Grapefruit League games in Florida and during the summer from minor league baseball AAA Red Sox games in Pawtucket, Rhode Island.

If the experiments continue to show progress by the 2018 season these major market franchises might be leaving the heavy iron in the garage. Be assured, sports broadcasters throughout North America are watching this closely as they begin their own cost-cutting efforts.

There’s a case to be made that the news is not as bad as it seems for the larger media tech players such as Avid, EVS, and Belden (Grass Valley). Budget pressures are spurring consolidation of independent broadcasters. These large station groups are likely to settle on a single vendor in each product category. Though the industry is notoriously conservative, all it takes is one disruptor to win a deal to get everybody looking at the new, more cost effective solution. Over the past year there has been a perceptible uptick interest in connecting the Adobe Creative Cloud tools to existing shared storage and asset management infrastructure.

Adobe Creative Cloud Market Size 2018 (projected)

Adobe’s estimated Creative Cloud 2018 revenue projections by segment ©2015 Adobe

Though it’s difficult to extrapolate media technology spend from Adobe’s reported growth in enterprise term licenses, Adobe has pinned much of the growth in Creative Cloud adoption of enterprise term license agreements (ETLAs). These licenses typically have a 36 month term with each customer, giving competitors a very small window once every three years to make a play to convert the enterprise to its solution. Adobe is projecting success in the enterprise, projecting $3.8 billion in recurring revenue from Creative Cloud for teams and enterprise by 2018.

Adobe has been well-rewarded for its brave decision to migrate all Creative Cloud customers to a subscription model, but it will run into some headwinds among some of the large station groups. As one station group executive told me, “Everyone thinks we’re eager to jump to OPEX from CAPEX with our technology spend, but that’s not true. We’re focused on keeping OPEX down.” In a consolidating industry, acquisitions are funded by stock transfers. Share price is tied to operating margins, hence the desire to keep OPEX down. Offering a choice between SaaS and perpetual license models, Avid should be able to maintain its current position, and perhaps grow it, in the station group segment.

Consolidation won’t last forever. There are a finite number of independent broadcast stations remaining ripe for purchase, and nobody is launching new ones. What we’re seeing is similar to the consolidation of newspapers during the 1990s in the early years of this century. As customer bases shrink and profits sink, cost cutting through consolidation takes hold throughout a market segment. No one was buying up newspapers for the long haul.

There is one significant difference between broadcasters and their newspaper cousins that makes a broadcast station a better long term investment. Spectrum, a finite resource. Its value will increase over time. Broadcasters aren’t in the broadcast business as much as they are in the spectrum investment business.

The place to be in media technology these days is IP-based video cloud-based SaaS offerings that multi-platform and OTT delivery. The days of big iron in broadcast, like the days of big iron in post are over.

Creativity and execution

I’ve had the honor of working with some of the most brilliant people on the planet across several industries, and have often marveled they they are not the most successful.

“People of mediocre ability sometimes achieve outstanding success because they don’t know when to quit.”

George Allen,  NFL Coach

Tenacity. Give me a half-baked idea that gets to market over the perfect idea stuck on a whiteboard.

“A little less conversation, a little more action.”

Elvis Presley

It really is possible to talk an idea to death. In business school they place a huge emphasis on business plans. Business plans serve a singular purpose. They validate ideas, but not through addressable market analysis and discounted cash flows. If you’re still passionate about your idea after all that analysis, odds are it’s a pretty good idea.

Every book on entrepreneurship tells the reader the business plan is a living document. Yeah, it lives in some folder on some hard disk. The most action it sees is getting scanned for viruses once a month.

Making the magic happen

After almost three years working among some of the best product managers, designers, and engineers at Avid, I’ve learned that great ideas will always come. We joke that if you build a company around a bunch of rock musicians and filmmakers cool shit is bound to happen. But the fact is that emphasis on execution is the path to success. Creative people instinctively hate process, but a healthy dose of process can be liberating. Media Composer 5.x and Pro Tools 9 were conceived from brilliant ideas, but they were born on ruthless execution.

Every effective team in any company has its own tricks. Here are a few I’ve seen work over the years.

Write it down

Creative people are easily distracted. The trick is to manage the distractions, and the best way to do that is to record everything. That stray thought, although profoundly brilliant, will hang around much longer if you’re afraid of losing it. Jot it down. Record a voice memo. Anything. What’s important is that you find a tool you enjoy using. Most productivity gurus recommend having one, single repository. That’s never worked for me. I use paper notebooks (with numbered pages), Livescribe notebooks, online notebooks, Post-its, photo albums on my phone, and good, old file folders. My index for this system lives online in an Evernote notebook.

Though it sounds like I use a confusing jumble of tools, it’s really a simple system.

  • Old fashioned computation notebook: I use the numbered graph paper pages for sketching. I often staple magazine clippings, Post-It notes, and other paper items to the pages. (I don’t use Livescribe notebooks this way simply because the electronically archivable dot paper notebooks are so damn expensive.)
  • Livescribe notebook: I use these mostly for meeting notes. The smart pens have built-in audio recorders, so that as I fall behind in my note taking I can start recording. The ability to electronically search hand-written notes in invaluable.
  • Blackberry: The camera records whiteboards, clever billboards, store displays, movie posters, and book covers. Anything I need to be reminded of. At the end of every week or so, I take what I want to keep and upload it to Evernote or Flickr.
  • Evernote: Once an idea gains some traction its detritus is gathered into a single entry in the online notebook. Every few days I catalog all the stuff I’ve recorded that’s worth keeping in Evernote. I just add a note on a topic and index where all the physical and electronic clippings live. Evernote’s super fast at searching hundreds of pages of notes. (It’s worth mentioning here that Springpad is another online notebook I use frequently. I find it stores personal data like restaurants, movies, etc. better than Evernote.)

As confusing and cluttered as this hodgepodge of recording methods sounds, it’s remarkably simple. And it’s visual, so it can be very inspiring.

Have a framework for action

Personal productivity methodologies like GTD (Getting Things Done) and Action Method are more like cults than tools, but if you take the parts of them you like and ignore the stuff that just feels too OCD-ish, they can be effective. OK, I admit I’m a recovering GTD addict. Action Method is now my tool of choice — simply because it looks like Greenhopper’s Jira, the tool we use to track Agile/Scrum development at Avid. At the end of the day it’s an online to-do list that cost $99/year unless you can persuade a fair number of colleagues to use its collaboration features. Most people will do just as well with the free, but visually ugly Voo2do.

Set aside playtime

My mid-afternoon lulls are the stuff of legend. I crash like no one else I know. So I set aside the time from about 2:00 to 3:30 as creative exploration time. I’m not going to get anything productive done in that time, so I find a way to put it to use. That includes those oft-forbidden office activities such as scanning Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Once I was caught perusing Monster. I was trying to figure out what other companies in our space were working on by checking out what positions they were filling in the down economy, but I’m not sure my colleague believed that at the time.

Have a sacred creative space (or two)

Ideally your special place is at the office, but as Jason Fried of 37 Signals noted in his TED talk Why Work Doesn’t Happen at Work, that’s rarely the case. Go ahead, use your first dedicated playtime to watch Fried’s talk.

My sacred creative space is my home office. It’s in the corner of the basement – away from the madding crowd. It’s got a great view of the conservation land behind my house for me to stare out at and ponder great things. But what’s really special is that I’ve set up two workspaces in it – one for the left brain, and one for the right.

The left-brained desk has my PC laptop and an iMac with all the expected office software. The desk phone and mobile phone are kept there. It’s where I take Skype and iChat meetings, and where I make conference calls. The right-brained desk and rack contains all my audio and video gear for Media Composer and Pro Tools. It’s where I edit my digital photos, and where I build my experimental little apps. It’s where I try out competitors’ products, and play meaningless games. Nothing to be done under deadline is taken on at that desk. It’s play space.

It’s amazing how my attitude, my posture, and my frame of mind change depending on the chair I occupy.  When in the work chair, it’s all about execution. When the going gets tough, I use the other chair as a carrot.

Work where you can get stuff done

Unfortunately most offices are not conducive to creativity. Has anyone ever had a good idea in an hour meeting with more more than a few people in the room? Work at home. Work at Starbucks. Work in the cafeteria. Just get away from Outlook.

Good luck. Please feel free to add comments about what works for you.


Avid Agility is released

Avid Agility bookVery rarely is the reincarnation of a classic pulled off successfully, but Steve Cohen’s done it with Avid Agility: Working Faster and More Intuitively with Avid Media Composer. To a generation of Media Composer editors, his Tips and Techniques manual got us up to professional speed with what was at the time a revolutionary piece of software. I don’t remember when I got mine. All I remember is sending a check and receiving a photocopied and bound text. Any specific tip, technique, or console command escapes me now — it was at least a dozen years since I read it, but the memory of it changing my approach to non-linear editing is fresh.

In keeping with tradition, Avid Agility is self-published, and it’s a good thing. Free of editorial constraints Steve is able to focus on what he finds important rather than having to write for the broadest possible audience. This book is aimed at those editors who want to use the tool to improve their craft. It’s not a technical reference manual covering I/O, codecs, etc. It’s all about how to use Media Composer to its fullest in pursuit of better storytelling.

Avid Agility is the first book I know of that goes into depth covering the new features of Media Composer 5 — the Smart Tool, Advanced Key Frames, etc. It’s an easy read, logically laid out, and useful to novice and experienced editor alike. Steve’s made several pages and the table of contents available on his site. I highly recommend this book.

Wooden pencils and NLEs

Think of commodities and hardly anything fits the bill better than the wooden pencil. It hasn’t changed in years. It’s difficult to imagine anyone making a purchasing decision on anything but price. Now try to imagine being the product designer at a wooden pencil company. On the worst day, virtually any job on the planet from toll taker to undertaker is light years more interesting.

Perhaps not.

In last week’s Economist, the Future of the Pencil outlined how Faber-Castell stays atop of the wooden pencil market. From non-toxic paint pledges during the age Chinese manufacturing lead scares to adding little rubber dots to help school kids get a grip, the eight-generation family-owned business continues to innovate — and maintain some pricing power where you’d least expect it.

I’m just as uninterested in wooden pencil market dynamics as the next guy, but the lesson any designer or creative professional should take from all this is that there’s room for innovation and creativity in nearly every endeavor. Two and a half years ago a lot of people were saying the non-linear editor was done. It was complete, a commodity. Cash cow it and innovate elsewhere was the common wisdom. Like the designers at Faber-Castell, the newly hired leadership team at Avid thought differently, and if not for that I’d have a pretty boring gig. Whether it’s editing directly from XDCAM media or editing on the cloud, the NLE market remains vibrant. And I remain gainfully employed.

Running Avid software on legacy machines

The folks at Genius DV posted this neat little trick to enable editors to run Avid Media Composer on PCs with unsupported audio cards.

For mission critical work I’m hesitant to use unsupported configurations, but sometimes I just want to get a jump on things and start logging on an old laptop.

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